Tag Archives: print sale

National Pollinator Week Print Sale

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pollination_sale

All prints from Alex Wild Photography’s pollination gallery are up to 70% off during Pollinator Week.

June 15-21 is Pollinator Week.

We should not have to designate a week for this. Coffee, chocolate, raspberries, almonds, melons, tequila, blueberries, and countless other delectables require floral visits by certain species of animals. Usually, insects. If you like any of these things, you should already appreciate the importance of healthy, diverse ecosystems.

But apparently not many people recognize where food comes from, or even that flowers only exist because of insects. So here we are: Pollinator Week.

The best way to celebrate Pollinator Week- while sipping coffee & enjoying raspberry-melon tart- is to draw up plans to rip out your boring lawn and replace it with pollinator-friendly native flowers. You may also write your congressperson (if you have moved on to tequila at this point, I wouldn’t blame you) to demand protection of the vanishing natural habitats where pollinators live.

garden

The prairie garden I begrudgingly left behind when moving from Illinois to Texas. We did take the cat, though.

 

Of lesser impact, I have priced my entire pollination gallery at near-cost sale rates for the week. If you’d like to pick up a 5×7″ print for as little as $3.99, have a look:

Alex Wild Photography 2015 Pollinator Week Print Sale

Anyway. Happy Pollinator Week. Get your hands dirty.

 

The 2014 Holiday Print Sale!

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sale
 
I am pleased to announce the return of the annual Holiday Print Sale, now in our third year! This year’s selection features 30 favorite photographs reduced up to 70% off regular pricing. Have a look:

Holiday Print Sale- Alex Wild’s Insect Photographs

 
Pieces are printed by the professional Bay Photo labs using high-quality papers and archival photo inks. These are not simple posters! Bay Photo will also custom mount, mat & frame images if you choose “add frames & more” when you check out.

Why the sale? I know a portion of my photos go to students looking for something buggy to hang on their walls, and to parents of budding young entomologists, and these folks are not in the demographic that typically plays in the fine art market. So I’ve assembled an affordable gallery of some of my best known and biologically informative natural history images priced near cost. An 8×12″ print, for example, is just $9.99. I hope you enjoy them!

Dasymutilla fine art print

Dasymutilla occidentalis velvet ant; 12×18″ print on a 3/4″ standout mount. Sale price $15.99/$42.99 unmounted/mounted. (Regular $60/$120)


 
Sale prices extend to January 1st. If you’d like your prints to arrive by Christmas under a 3-5 day shipping option, order by December 12th.

Last Day of the Holiday Print Sale!

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A reminder that the great holiday print sale of 2013 comes to a close at midnight EST tonight, January 1st. The next sale is not for a few months and will cover a different set of photographs. If anything in the gallery catches your eye, today is your last chance to pick something up at the discounted rate!

Alex Wild’s 2013 Holiday Insect Print Sale

Prints of all photos have sold, but the top movers have been:

1. Bees on pollen-filled comb

Apis91a

2. Pollen-filled comb, without bees

Apis88a

3. (tie) Mating Hyalophorus moths; Toxomerus hover fly on spider wort


Hyalophora6a

Toxomerus1a

 

 

 

Behind the Photo: Mating Moths

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Hyalophora6

Hylaphora cecropia – once among North America’s most common large insects, is now rare.

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Some photography projects are planned months in advance. Others just sort of happen at unexpected moments. Like, when taking out the trash.

One summer evening a couple years ago, while dumping rubbish in the can, I spotted these spectacular moths up against the house behind the recycling bin. Cecropia moths, mating on the young female’s cocoon! These giant silk moths used to be common insects in the eastern United States, but owing to a combination of biocontrol gone wrong and habitat loss I don’t see more than one or two individuals a season. It was a rare find in an unphotogenic setting, wedged up next to the cinderblock foundation.

Hyalophora5

 

I wanted a photograph of course, but in situ I had no room to maneuver nor any hope of a non-industrial backdrop. So I opted to move them. The moths stayed put when I pulled up their redbud sapling for transplant to a studio whitebox. Whiteboxes allow precise control over lighting and backdrop, and with subjects as cooperative as these I had ample time to experiment. In the final photograph the moth’s behavior is natural, as is the foreground plant, but the setting and light are staged. The backdrop is a single colored posterboard, curved slightly to add a light gradient.

Once finished with the project, I moved the amorous insects to a nearby tree trunk. After continuing to mate for a few more minutes, they flew off.

If you’d like a print, this photograph is one of 30 I’ve included in the Holiday Print Sale, running until January 1.


Photo details:
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 macro lens on a Canon EOS 7D
ISO 100, f/16, 1/100 sec
Lit by an off-camera flash in a white box

Behind the Photo: A Mantis in Natural Light

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Tenodera14

A young chinese mantis, Tenodera sinensis, climbs a black-eyed susan. Urbana, Illinois, USA.

This shot of a small mantis is not in my usual style. Most of my photos are lit with flash; here I drew only from the ambient light of early evening. While I like to think I’m being creative with these natural images, I’m really aping the style of a favorite insect photographer, the amazing Rick Lieder. In an interview I conducted with Rick earlier this year, he describes the importance of backdrop:

“If I have a style, part of it is that the background is as important as the subject. If I don’t have a good background, I usually don’t make an image. I think of myself like a stage director or set designer, I’m creating a stage and waiting for something to happen within it.”

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Rick Lieder, 2013 interview

With light filtering through a maple tree in the backdrop, I found that slight changes in my position led to drastic changes in the appearance of the photograph. The orbs of light in the backdrop are no accident; I shifted my position around until I had the mantis framed in the middle of a particularly bright spot.

If you’d like a print, this photograph is one of 30 I’ve included in the Holiday Print Sale, running until January 1.


photo details:
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 macro lens on a Canon EOS 7D
ISO 1600, f/5, 1/200 sec

Behind the Photo: A Native Bee in the Prairie Garden

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Lasioglossum10s

A Lasioglossum sweat bee.

Our house in Urbana hosted a standard urban lawn when we moved in a few years back. Grass. A few dandelions. It was mowable, but not exciting otherwise.

To spice things up, I’ve been replacing the lawn with native plants. In early summer, our yard is now a colorful meadow:

garden

Black-eyed susans, prairie milkweed, New England aster, ironweed, blazing star, and other native plants grow in the garden under the watchful eyes of Mingus the Cat.

The garden has benefits beyond mere aesthestics. Our homegrown prairie patch provides a wealth of opportunities for pollinator photography. The Lasioglossum sweat bee is one of many images I’ve taken on the black-eyed susans. These easy yellow asters seeded across the meadow from a single pot I transplanted in 2010.

Photographing pollinators well requires doing more than just pointing a camera at a bee and snapping away. A key aspect of the top photograph is its low angle. By crouching down to bee height and shooting up, I captured a perspective that transforms a seemingly insignificant bee into a larger-than-life animal, one worthy of the respect our increasingly troubled native pollinators deserve.

If you’d like a print, the native bee photograph is one of 30 I’ve included in the Holiday Print Sale, running until January 1.


photo details:
Canon MP-E  on a Canon EOS 7D
ISO 200, f/13, 1/200 sec
Lit with diffuse off-camera twin flash

Behind the Photo: Firefly at Dusk

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Photinus10s

A male eastern firefly, Photinus pyralis, hovers to watch for signaling females. Urbana, Illinois.

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We moved to Illinois from Tucson in 2008. The naturalist in me cringed at the relocation. Tucson is surrounded by rich natural deserts, national parks, and state forests. Champaign-Urbana is buried in a monotony of industrial corn/soy production. Illinois nature was more than 90% plowed under years ago and hasn’t returned.

Yet the midwest has its buggy bright points. What’s left of the local ant fauna remains mostly native and hosts an array of fascinating social parasites. The famous 13-year periodical cicadas emerged again in 2011. And the fireflies! The common eastern firefly Photinus pyralis launches a tremendous show in June and July. Western fireflies for the most part don’t glow as adults. I missed them when I live in Arizona.

I’d been telling Mrs. Myrmecos every year since the move, “this is the summer I finally shoot the fireflies!” and then, for various reasons, I fail to follow through. For a specialized insect photographer to not have photographs of the most spectacular local insect phenomenon was getting ridiculous.

My schedule this past summer finally conspired to allow plenty of evening firefly time, though, so I went at them with a vengeance. If you haven’t seen the results, I’ve uploaded them here: Phenomenal Fireflies.

Learning to shoot fireflies on the wing wasn’t easy, but I can distill the strategy down to one key point: spend a few evenings watching the animals behave. Each species has a particular courtship pattern, this pattern is predictable, and if you learn it you’re much more likely to know where to put the camera and when to time the shot. Photinus pyralis males have a six-second cycle : swoop upward while lit, hover for a couple seconds to watch for a female return signal, the fly forward a few feet to begin the next run.

After some practice hand-holding a pre-focused camera rig and flash, I was able to not only get a flying firefly in focus, I was able to plan for particular backdrops. The photograph above shows a male at the height of his ascent, watching for females.

If you’d like a print, this photograph is one of 30 I’ve included in the Holiday Print Sale, running until January 1.


photo details:
Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM & 12mm extension tube on a Canon EOS 6D
ISO 800, f/10, 1/25 sec
Lit with diffuse off-camera strobe

The Holiday Print Sale Returns!

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print-5780

Dasymutilla occidentalis velvet ant; 12×18″ print on a 3/4″ standout mount. Sale price $15.99/$42.99 unmounted/mounted. (Regular $60/$120)

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I am pleased to announce the return of the holiday print sale! This year’s selection features 30 favorite photographs reduced up to 70% off regular pricing. Have a look:

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Holiday Print Sale- Alex Wild’s Insect Photographs

.
Pieces are printed by the professional Bay Photo labs using high-quality papers and archival photo inks. These are not simple posters! Bay Photo will also custom mount, mat & frame images if you choose “add frames & more” when you check out.

Why the sale? I know a portion of my photos go to biology students looking for something buggy to hang on their walls, and to parents of budding young entomologists, and these folks are not in the demographic that typically plays in the fine art market. So I’ve assembled an affordable gallery of some of my best known and biologically informative natural history images priced near cost. An 8×12″ print, for example, is just $9.99. I hope you enjoy them!

print-5762

Toxomerus hover fly feeding from spiderwort, 16×24″ print on a 3/4″ standout mount. ($45.99/$88.99 unmounted/mounted; Regular price $150/$250).

 

Sale prices extend to January 1st. If you’d like your prints to arrive by Christmas under a 3-5 day shipping option, order by December 12th.

print-5795

Drosophila melanogaster white-eyed mutant, 12×18″ print on a 3/4″ standout mount. ($15.99/$42.99 unmounted/mounted; Regular price $60/$120).