The Many Talents of Trap-Jaw Ants…

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…include swimming gracefully across water. Astounding:

This, from a new study by Steve Yanoviak in the Journal of Experimental Biology:

Abstract: Upon falling onto the water surface, most terrestrial arthropods helplessly struggle and are quickly eaten by aquatic predators. Exceptions to this outcome mostly occur among riparian taxa that escape by walking or swimming at the water surface. Here we document sustained, directional, neustonic locomotion (i.e. surface swimming) in tropical arboreal ants. We dropped 35 species of ants into natural and artificial aquatic settings in Peru and Panama to assess their swimming ability. Ten species showed directed surface swimming at speeds >3 body lengths s−1, with some swimming at absolute speeds >10 cm s−1. Ten other species exhibited partial swimming ability characterized by relatively slow but directed movement. The remaining species showed no locomotory control at the surface. The phylogenetic distribution of swimming among ant genera indicates parallel evolution and a trend toward negative association with directed aerial descent behavior. Experiments with workers of Odontomachus bauri showed that they escape from the water by directing their swimming toward dark emergent objects (i.e. skototaxis). Analyses of high-speed video images indicate that Pachycondylaspp. and O. bauri use a modified alternating tripod gait when swimming; they generate thrust at the water surface via synchronized treading and rowing motions of the contralateral fore and mid legs, respectively, while the hind legs provide roll stability. These results expand the list of facultatively neustonic terrestrial taxa to include various species of tropical arboreal ants.

source: Yanoviak, SP, Frederick, DN. 2014. Water surface locomotion in tropical canopy ants. J Exp Biol 217, 2163-2170. doi: 10.1242/​jeb.101600

2 thoughts on “The Many Talents of Trap-Jaw Ants…”

  1. My arboreal ants, Camponotus pennsylvanicus, show no swimming abilities (i.e. they drown in my sink), but they have well developed directed aerial descent behavior (when I throw them against the wall!).

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