Monday Night Mystery: What do these two things have in common?

1. GCTTAATAAAATTAATTAAATCAGTTTCAAAAATAAGTAGACACGCGTTGTTGTTATTCG

2. Myrmecos points will be awarded to the first person to provide answers to the following questions:

  1. What is that bizarre blue landscape? (3 points)
  2. To what organism (Genus & species, please) does the DNA sequence belong? (2 points)
  3. What is the connection between these two things? (5 points)

The cumulative points winner for the month of February will take home their choice of 1) any 8×10-sized print from my photo galleries, or 2) a guest post here on Myrmecos.

Good luck!

13 thoughts on “Monday Night Mystery: What do these two things have in common?”

  1. 1) Manduca sexta
    2) PolyDNAvirus of Cotesia congregata
    3) The Cotesia braconid wasp parasitizes M. sexta and the virus attacks the caterpillar immune system

    Feeling like i’m back to the linnean games…

  2. Damn people are fast. Maybe you could moderate comments for the first 24 hours on these mystery posts and not show comments for a bit. Still give all or majority of points to first poster, but maybe give tie-breaker points to others who get it right before the answer is revealed.

    Just a minor suggestion that would allow more people to play along. Yes I am bitter that I got beat to the molecular answer 😉

  3. If that is a Manduca sexta larva, it is obviously lab-reared, as only artificial diet-fed caterpillars develop that shocking blue color, while plant-fed ones are a more normal shade of green.

  4. 1. Lepidopteran larvae (Manduca sexta)’s external surface
    2.Cotesia congregata virus (GenBank Accession no. : AJ632318.1)
    3. The DNA belongs to a polydnavirus (Bracovirus) which are used by parasitic wasps to infect the wasps’ host (lepidopteran larvae) and manipulate the host’s defense
    mechanism and allow the development of the parasitoid larvae.

  5. 1. Lepidopteran larva’s external surface
    2.Cotesia congregata virus (GenBank Accession no. : AJ632318.1)
    3. The DNA belongs to a polydnavirus (Bracovirus) which are used by parasitic wasps to infect the wasps’ host (lepidopteran larvae) and manipulate the host’s defense
    mechanism and allow the development of the parasitoid larvae.

  6. Pingback: Answer to the Monday Mystery – MYRMECOS - Insect Photography - Insect Pictures

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